venerdì 28 dicembre 2018

Roundtable: should we be practicing and promoting veganism?


Should we be practicing and promoting veganism?

materiale didattico estratto dal sito 

https://go.parlayideas.com/

What are we discussing today?

SDG Target 13.3 (Build Knowledge and Capacity to Meet Climate Change)
Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning..
Today we’re going to be discussing the relationship between meat/dairy consumption and climate change.

 Discussion guide by Parlay

Why is it important/relevant?

In previous decades, debates about the existence of climate change have been common. Now, armed with undeniable statistics, the scientific community is united around the facts: the climate is changing, humans are causing it, and the effects are already devastating.
If current trends continue, ocean levels will continue to rise as the world’s ice melts. Millions will become migrants as their homelands flood. Rainstorms and hurricanes will continue to intensify. Droughts and wildfires will become even more severe, leaving countless millions unable to feed themselves. Conflicts over resources will increase. Even worse -- scientists warn of a “tipping point” when ancient methane, long trapped beneath Earth’s permafrost, starts entering the atmosphere at an unstoppable rate. If this happens, even a humanity that emits zero CO2 globally won’t be able to halt the warming.
The Paris Agreement -- an international treaty to combat climate change which includes all nations except the United States -- came into effect in November of 2016. It aims to avoid the worst case scenarios by limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial averages. (We already passed 1.0 degrees Celsius in 2016 and, at current rates of carbon dioxide emissions, we would “bake in” 2.0 degrees of warming in less than twenty years.)
We know that we need to rapidly shift our energy consumption habits away from fossil fuels and towards sustainable technologies such as wind and solar. When asked, the vast majority of people guess “transportation” as the top contributor to climate change. The vast majority of people are wrong.
Animal agriculture contributes more to climate change than all transportation emissions combined. How is this possible? For the answers, you will need to dive into the content below and, hopefully, some research of your own. And after considering all of the facts, one big question will remain: should we all be practicing and promoting veganism?
(Note: vegans are not the same as vegetarians. The latter still consume products that come from animals, such as milk and cheese.)

Content & Multimedia

First, let’s read/watch these resources:
1. The targets for SDG 13: Climate Action Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts.
2. If you have a Netflix account or You Tube and a couple of hours to spare, we recommend the documentary Cowspiracy as a great place to start your research.


3. What if the World went Vegetarian?  -- a four minute video from AsapSCIENCE.
4. Livestock Create a Major Methane Problem  -- short video from Discovery.
5. Veganism is Not the Key to Sustainable Development -- an opinion piece published in The Guardian.
6. The Diet that Helps Fight Climate Change -- a six minute video from Vox.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nUnJQWO4YJY
7. Documento della Società Italiana di Nutrizione Umana sulla
    Dieta Vegetariana: 
    http://www.sinu.it/public/pdf/documento-diete-veg-esteso-finale-2018.pdf

Discussion Questions

  1. Do you feel like you have a moral responsibility to contribute to the fight against climate change? Why or why not?
  2. Do you think that those who are part of this fight should be practicing and promoting a vegan diet? If not, are there other dietary changes that you would recommend or incorporate into your own life?
If this subject really interests you, please feel free to do some additional research and include it in your submission. Don’t worry about being “right”. The point of this discussion is to explore these ideas together.

Peer Feedback

After submitting your response, read at least two of your classmates’ responses and post a reply. Did they change your perspective in any way? Do you disagree? Why or why not? Can you add to their ideas?
(you can edit before inviting students)
Author: Ada
Subject Area: Government & Politics,  Sustainable Development Goals,  World Issues
Level: Advanced,  Introductory
Instructional Notes: Length of activity: 3 days (5 if you watch Cowspiracy)

giovedì 27 dicembre 2018

Roundtable: “Pay-As-You-Throw” for Garbage Collection.

Should Municipalities Enact “Pay-As-You-Throw” 
for Garbage Collection? 
 
materiale didattico estratto dal sito 

https://go.parlayideas.com/

What are we discussing today?

SDG Target 12.5 (Substantially Reduce Waste Generation)
By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse.
Today we’re going to be debating which method of funding for garbage collection is preferable: a flat fee or pay-as-you-throw.

Why is it important/relevant?

Our world now produces about a trillion kilograms of garbage per year. Among the options of burn, bury, pile, and recycle, we all know the latter is preferable; the former choices poison our water, our land, and our air.
As individuals we are encouraged to sort our trash in order to reduce the number of garbage bags we toss to the street. That encouragement, however, does not often involve financial incentives; we pay the same flat tax rate whether we throw out two bags or twelve.
Polluting should never be free,” say supporters of pay-as-you-throw programs that now exist in thousands of communities around the world. They point to things like increased rates of recycling and decreased taxation.
Others worry that larger families will struggle to pay, or that some citizens will save money by illegally dumping their trash elsewhere.
Before stating your opinions, we suggest that you do some reading and fact-finding of your own.

Content & Multimedia

First, let’s read/watch these resources:
3. A WasteZero “Pay-as-You-Throwadvertisement.

Discussion Questions

  1. Should municipalities enact a “pay-as-you-throw’ program for garbage collection?
  2. Reducing and reusing are even more impactful than recycling. What are some ideas you (or others) have for doing so?  
  3. Globally, about one-third of all food is wasted. What measures have already been taken to reduce this percentage? What ideas can you come up with?
If this subject really interests you, please feel free to do some additional research and include it in your submission. Don’t worry about being “right”. The point of this discussion is to explore these ideas together.

Peer Feedback

After submitting your response, read at least two of your classmates’ responses and post a reply. Did they change your perspective in any way? Do you disagree? Why or why not? Can you add to their ideas?
Author: Ada
Subject Area: Government & Politics,  Mathematics,  Sustainable Development Goals,  World Issues
Level: Advanced,  Introductory
Instructional Notes: Length of activity: 3 days

martedì 18 dicembre 2018

Roundtable: is Internet a right?


materiale didattico estratto dal sito 
https://go.parlayideas.com/

ROUNDTABLE: IS INTERNET A RIGHT?
 

Sustainable Development Goals:  Target 9.C
(Universal Access to Information and Communications Technology)
"Significantly increase access to information and communications technology and strive to provide universal and affordable access to the Internet in least developed countries by 2020."

Today we’re going to be discussing whether or not online access should be considered a basic right of all humans.

Why is it important/relevant?

First, let us read what UN.org has to say about human rights:

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into over 500 languages.
Most people agree that things like food, water, shelter, education, and freedom should be guaranteed rights for all humans, regardless of where they were born or who governs them. However, as technology continues to rapidly change how people live, learn and work, many have begun to also consider the internet (Which hit the 4 billion users milestone in 2018) as a basic human right. Others argue that although it is an important means to gaining other rights, it should not be categorized alongside them as essential.
In 2016, the United Nations chose a side in this debate and added online access as a human right. It also condemned countries that take away or disrupt their citizens’ access for political reasons.

Content & Multimedia

First, let’s read/watch these resources:

1. The targets for SDG 9: Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure


2. What are the Universal Human Rights? -- from TED-Ed on YouTube.


3. https://youtu.be/nDgIVseTkuE

4. https://youtu.be/b3CwQTemDbM

5. https://youtu.be/499IbhoBeKE

6. Internet Access is Not a Human Right -- a New York Times Op-Ed.

7. In Europe, Central Asia, and North America, more than 70% of the population had access to the internet in 2015. However, in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, that rate is barely over 20%. Explore the numbers in greater detail with this Our World in Data article.

Discussion Questions


  1. The internet should be a basic human right. Agree or Disagree.
  2. While nearly everyone agrees that the internet is a useful tool, there is far less agreement about how much of the internet should be visible. The so-called “Great Firewall of China,” for example, tightly restricts access to information and various social media. Is this acceptable? What about access to the so-called “Dark Net,” land of drug dealers, child abusers, and human traffickers? Where, in your view, should the access lines be drawn?
  3. Brainstorm a list of actions that you think governments and companies could take in order to increase internet access rates around the world. Rank your top five ideas according to “likelihood of being effective.”
If this subject really interests you, please feel free to do some additional research and include it in your submission. Don’t worry about being “right”. The point of this discussion is to explore these ideas together.

Peer Feedback

After submitting your response, read at least two of your classmates’ responses and post a reply. Did they change your perspective in any way? Do you disagree? Why or why not? Can you add to their ideas?